January to February: Resolution or Revolution?

Several years ago, I heard a psychologist on the radio suggest that instead of trying to jump-start a New Year’s resolution or major life change on January 1st–right in the midst of the hustle of the holiday season–why not use January as a month for reflection and planning so that FEBRUARY can be the month for a new start?  I liked that suggestion.

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I came into the month of January with a lot of ideas about the goals I would set for 2013.  I already knew that I would work on focus.  I knew that I needed deliberate practice in being mentally present in my day-to-day life.  Maybe you are like me.  I do a lot of daydreaming, a lot of planning for the future.  I can get stuck in a week’s worth of daydreams just because I found a hypothetical something that tickled my imagination.  I am easily distracted from NOW because I’m thinking about later.  Partly, I think I’m like this because I’ve been a student from the time I was four until I left my PhD program about a month before my thirty-first birthday (more about that here).  As a student, especially a graduate student, you are kind of living for the future.  There is always a goal to reach, a step to take, an accomplishment to check off the list.  All of these things hold the promise of something better later.  Graduate school is a great exercise in delayed gratification.  You live like a pauper hoping that someday you won’t have to!

I digress.  (Ironic!)

So in the midst of planning to focus, I started planning a lot of other goals.  I was going to commit to keeping a journal, and then I decided that I needed two journals–one for practical matters and one for fun, artistic stuff.  Then I decided that I also would need a prayer journal.  So much for being focused, huh?  I set some goals about organizing my home.  I set a goal about money management and keeping my e-mail inbox clean.  I set exercising goals and made a plan to read more, take more pictures, and be in more pictures.  Sigh.  I’m really bad at being focused.

Then, right at the end of the month, everything became clear in a three part mini act of God.  First, one of my favorite blogs featured a post that looked a little like mine.  A sweet, godly mom was reflecting on how she had been in survival mode rather than growing in her faith journey.  I quickly wrote to defend her, but I realized that I am doing the same thing, and in writing to support her, I was sort of telling myself that “I’m okay” when maybe I am not.  Secondly, my husband realized that we had drifted pretty far in our financial giving to others and to our church.  In the past, we have seen how much we are blessed by giving, and we want to be generous even in our own struggles.  Very hard, and we totally fail…often.  It was not some sort of legalistic You-Must-Give-Everything-You-Own-Or Else moment; rather it was just a self-assessment of where we once were compared to where we are now.  I, too, had felt that we’ve been living for us instead of truly living for others as we’ve been called to do.  I began to reconsider my New Year’s resolutions at that point.

At the start of the final week of January, I volunteered to teach our Sunday School class on February 3rd.  The people in the class take turns leading it, and I was just in the mood to take a Sunday.  During the service, I decided to sneak a look at the passage that I would be teaching:  Hebrews 5.  Ugh.  That’s a tough one.  And here is where my attention was truly grabbed:

12 For though by this time you ought to be teachers, you need someone to teach you again the basic principles of the oracles of God. You need milk, not solid food, 13 for everyone who lives on milk is unskilled in the word of righteousness, since he is a child. 14 But solid food is for the mature, for those who have their powers of discernment trained by constant practice to distinguish good from evil.

Hebrews 5:12-14

While I’m busy caring for kids, tending to a home, messing around on Facebook, folding laundry and neglecting to put it away, driving to and fro, glancing longingly at other people’s lives on cute blogs, reading this and that, sweeping up endless amounts of dry cereal, and doing more laundry, I’m not always growing in the ways that are important–to me or to God.  I am not complaining about my current season of life at all.  I actually love this time in my life with all its messes and demands.  I wouldn’t trade all the cereal for even the biggest paycheck.  Nonetheless, I’ve been in a funk, and I knew I wanted to stop moving through this comfortable but very safe life and instead feel what it is like to have nothing holding me up but God’s will.  Does that make sense?

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I used to be on a major spiritual growth spurt.  During college, I was on fire!  I was reading my Bible and building a healthy prayer life.  It was a great time.  But it was also a time of personal struggle for a lot of reasons, and those dark moments fueled my hunger for God.  I wanted to feel Him and know Him better.  I guess I got too comfy in recent years because the hunger has changed.  I still long for God’s presence and His care, but I seem to want to meet that need in ways that don’t require my work or my time.  Hmmm…not good.  I’ve had “the milk” many times over, but I have to wonder: am I ready for the solid food?  Am I going to just remain satisfied to sip at the sweet but simple parts of the gospel or chomp on the hard stuff?  The real question though: am I going to live it or just think about it.  Some more.  Again.

If you made it to the end of this very long post, here is the conclusion that I’ve reached:

I can set a New Year’s resolution.  It would fine if I worked on the goal to keep my laundry washed and my bedroom floor clear of clutter.  Those are good things.  It would be okay to commit to exercising five days per week or eating more veggies.  But I decided that I don’t need another resolution.  I need a revolution.  I apologize for the corny play on words, but maybe it will stick in your head the way it has in mine.  I need to turn back to the things that matter beyond my day-to-day.  It does begin with focus as I said in the beginning, and the follow-through is a big dose of study and prayer, two things that have moved to the periphery as I unconsciously decided that my house and homeschooling and money (or lack of it) and many other things were more important.

I have no idea if this blog matters in big ways or even small ones, but since it is an extension of me, Warm as Pie is going to change, too.  If you’ve been here before, I’m sure you noticed the new look.  The menu across the top has an addition that I hope you will explore, and the “About” section has been updated as well.  I’ve added a few things to the “Places I Love” page, too.  Each month, I’ll be highlighting different blogs, websites, and even family interviews.  I cannot wait to introduce you to my first family!  But if you’re not really a fan of change, don’t worry.  Most of my blog content will be pretty much the same.  Just me thinking about stuff, taking pictures, and sweeping cereal.

Convicted, yet Uplifted

One week ago, I heard a sermon that left me thinking…and thinking.  The sermon itself had many points that continued to poke at me as the rest of the week passed, but a brief comment exchanged between me and the pastor as I left the sanctuary and we shared the customary hand shake pulled together the illustrations and theme into a clear take-away message for me.  I thanked the pastor for his sermon, and I told him that it was “both convicting and uplifting.”  He replied, “What’s one without the other?” and he thanked me for my feedback.  I could not get that idea out of my head.  As I drove home alone (The kids were under the weather last Sunday, so Daddy stayed home with them.), the idea of conviction as a source of being uplifted rolled around in my mind.  Here are some of my thoughts.

:: If we didn’t feel or know God’s conviction of our failures (our sin), we would wallow there.  We would live rather casually in our own filth, unaware of our stench.  We would never be more; we would never grow.  We might feel something was off, but I don’t think we would care very much without the discomfort of conviction.

:: When we are convicted, we are in a really fertile spot.  We can accept the sting of conviction–and with God’s grace–let that sting be a sort of growing pain.  We can be lifted from a dirty, mucky place and reach skyward–a growth spurt that we would never have taken if we hadn’t known that we were stagnant and broken.

:: If God didn’t promise to lift us but merely pointed an angry finger at us and shot us to the ground, His conviction would not be fruitful.  Being the sovereign God of all, his conviction would be just and right, but it would produce only punishment.  Conviction without grace is like stamping on new plant’s first shoots every time they break through soil.  God doesn’t OWE us His grace; He could stomp all He wanted and leave no room for growth, but fortunately, God is a loving, compassionate father, and His conviction comes with an unimaginable dose of mercy and the promise of help to be more than our sinful little selves.

:: In our judicial system, we convict criminals.  A conviction is an official declaration of guilt.  In theory, a conviction and a sentence to prison or service carries the possibility of rehabilitation.  In the best of situations, a conviction is a chance to turn a wrong to right, a crooked path to a straight one.  That happens sometimes.  Unfortunately, the system is endlessly flawed with potentially unjust convictions and other complicated factors that work together to create a culture of anger, bitterness, mistrust, and entitlement inside the prison walls.  Rehabilitation seems like a very unlikely result.  It’s imperfect, but even this literal, judicial conviction pauses the cycle of crime and potentially reverses it.  How much better, then, is God’s conviction of us in His perfect justice, mercy, and grace?

:: The opposite is worth considering as well.  What does it mean to be uplifted without having been convicted?  We could believe that Jesus came and died on the cross simply as a nice thing to do.  We could even recognize the beauty of his selfless act.  But Christ’s act isn’t redemptive if we weren’t in sin to begin with.  The story of Jesus would only be drama–just a bunch of fireworks, and the sense of peace and hope that believers possess would be empty.  Faith would have no power because the source of our faith would all be show.  We cannot truly be uplifted if we were never guilty.  The “lifting” is also meaningless if we are guilty but never convicted of that guilt.  We can’t have all the joy of the faith if we don’t want to look at our sin.  We would be raised from where?  If we don’t know that God’s love is unmerited, we can’t understand that we need His salvation and are powerless on our own.

::  And here is where I’ve been all week:  I can lift my children up by praising their every little act, word, or creation.  I can let them live in a big puddle of empty praise that does nothing to help them better themselves.  In time, when the world shows them their faults and they realize that they cannot be the champion in every race, they will distrust me and fall embarrassingly into a heap of humiliation.  I can also convict my children of their mistakes.  I can shout at them for leaving their toys all over the place, dropping one shoe at the door and the other under the couch, hitting a sibling in the heat of a disagreement, and forgetting their manners at the table.  I can issue a punishment for their disobedience, send them to their room for talking back or lying or neglecting a chore.  But if I only convict and never teach, I leave my children in a place from which they can never rise.  They must know their failures but see the opportunity to rise.  That will only happen if I extend them grace, teach them what to do instead of yelling what not to do, and welcome them into a place where it is safe to fall and to stand again.  I will aim for that balance, all the while giving thanks that God has the equation just right as He parents me.

When I think about this “convicting versus uplifting” dichotomy, I realize that the pastor was quite right.  One is nothing without the other.  A conviction is an end.  A sense of being uplifted is just an elevator ride.  When in balance, conviction is discipleship–the learning, the awareness, the launch pad for salvation.

(Note: The actual sermon focused upon Luke 20: 19-26.  Jesus tells his listeners to give to Caesar what is Caesar’s and render to God what is God’s.  The sermon asked us to consider what is truly God’s (everything!) and what we fail to give Him.  It pushed us to examine ourselves for the sin that lingers in us and to rejoice that we can be set free from those sins by Christ who pays our debt and covers our shortcomings.)

Blogging for Peace: I Would Never Have Thought

When I re-started this blog almost three years ago (September 22), I never imagined what it would become for me.  And I didn’t realize–until these last few months–how much I would miss it when life took me away for awhile.  I would never have thought that blogging was so closely linked to my faith walk, but as the summer months pulled me away from the blog and out into the sunshine/pool/car/park/kitchen/zoo/lake/mall/library, I realized that my blog has become a gratitude journal of sorts, a place to stand before God and thank Him–with my words and my photographs–for the beautiful world and beautiful life that he has given me.  The blog gives me a chance to pause and reflect.  It puts perspective on the daily trials and helps me to realize that broken sleep and a messy kitchen should never take away my joy.  Even real, deep tragedy like a profound illness, unemployment, injury, poverty, and death do not have to be the end of joy when your joy comes from God.  This little spot on the internet gives me a chance to remember those things.

And so…I’m now blogging for peace.  To my own surprise, I’ve found that I  need this space, this chance to be myself, stretch my creativity a bit, and ponder the goodness of life, in order to have peace in my mind and spirit.  I had been forgetting to make time for such things, and the truth was revealed in my shortening patience, my negative “self-talk,” my discouragement, and a general sense of being down.  Time to get back on track!

Time for joy to take over.

So Much to Say About Being a Mom

(Giveaway Tuesday!!!!  Can’t wait to share the new MOPS book with you.)

In honor of Mothers’ Day and in celebration of the birth of my nephew, Miles, I am kicking off a blog series about motherhood.

Today is Mothers’ Day, and I’m filled with many emotions.  I miss my mom a lot.  Every single day.  I miss seeing my mom-in-law, too.  And my Grandma.  But I’m also grateful to celebrate my own motherhood next to the little snuggle bugs who made me “Mommy.”  This photograph was taken on the day that I first gained that oh-so-special title.

At the moment when I first held my new baby boy, I knew the “why” of my existence.  I felt certain that I had found the work for which I was made.  This arena is where I’m best equipped to impact the world and bring God joy.  It’s also the place where mistakes have a mighty sting and emotions can become painfully intertwined in the practical steps of daily life.  But the rewards are too great to articulate, too sacred to fully grasp.

Where have I been?

(Don’t forget my book review and giveaway on Tuesday, May 15.)

My blog has been really lagging lately.  I struggle to get a food budget post up each week, and I don’t want Warm As Pie to be a blog only about grocery shopping.  I find that I’ve been terribly distracted.

My attention has been pulled to finances, car issues, and mysterious leaking.  We got those things cleared up, and then I was distracted by the birth of my precious new nephew (yay!).

I’ve been going to t-ball games and practices.

I’ve been making library trips and reading the books that we choose.

I’ve been helping with homework and reading logs and wonderful projects of the imagination that require cardboard.  Lots of cardboard.

I’ve been stressing about this organizing project that is definitely losing momentum–more about that later.

I’ve been daydreaming about a real, functioning back porch and even hunting for some low cost furniture.

I’ve been beating myself up about all the things I don’t get done and at the same time trying to pull myself out of that funk so that I can see the light of my children’s faces and hear their joy and watch their growing little selves.

I’ve been feeling down.  I’ve been turning to the internet for a little inspiration, a little pick-me-up, and instead, what I find there is a cycle of discontent–not a place I want to be.

So where I am I now?

I’m reflecting on Zephaniah 3:17.  “The Lord your God is with you,  the Mighty Warrior who saves. He will take great delight in you; in his love He will no longer rebuke you,  but will rejoice over you with singing.”

I’m telling myself that if the big Lord of the Universe can rejoice over me, maybe I can decide that I’m alright after all.

I’m watching my baby drum on the fireplace with a crayon and a ball point pen.  I’m delighting in her joy and her enthusiasm.

I’m listening to my preschooler giggle to himself as he plays in the livingroom.

I’m waiting for my hubby to return so that we can pick up a cute little table for the back porch and maybe buy some sunny yellow paint for it.  We’ll see.

I’m making plans.  I’m giving thanks.  I’m zooming in on the important stuff.

Shrove Tuesday

I didn’t even know what Shrove Tuesday was until we joined a church seven years ago that acknowledges the day with a pancake supper.  Now I can’t imagine missing it!  The church uses Shrove Tuesday (a.k.a. Mardi Gras) as a wonderful tool for teaching children (and adults!) about Lent and how we prepare to experience the resurrection of Christ at Easter.  Being far away from the annual supper and “pancake fling” (such fun!), we decided to have our own Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper in our new home.

The following link does a nice job explaining Shrove Tuesday:  http://www.faithclipart.com/guide/Christian-Holidays/origins_of_shrove_tuesday.html.  In our version of the celebration, we enjoyed pancakes, sausage, little doughnuts, strawberries, and iced tea.  We played with Mardi Gras beads.  We talked about the different ways that people acknowledge Lent, and we decided as a family to continue our Lenten tree tradition and add some acts of charity this year.  I find Lent to be a particularly exciting time for teaching children about our faith.  It’s bursting with potential lessons!

 

 

Epiphany

Every year, I wish we did more with the celebration of Epiphany.  We always wait to take down our decorations until the full 12 days of Christmas have passed, but I felt like we were missing an opportunity to look at the story of Jesus from a different angle.  Since we didn’t spend Christmas in our new house, it felt good to do more celebrating and more telling of that beautiful story on 12th Night and Epiphany.

Because the little guy fell asleep on the actual 12th Night, we merged all of our activities into the day of Epiphany.  (Maybe we’ll get it right next year!)  During the day, J and I baked a Three Kings Cake.

We had dinner (spaghetti and salad), and after clean-up, we all headed to the livingroom for our “undecorating party.”  We put on the Christmas music for the last time.  The boys didn’t hang around for all of the undecorating, but we gave them some specific tasks to complete.  They removed the ornaments from the tree and carefully placed them in a box for me to wrap and store.

All the lights, bulbs, greenery, and other goodies were removed, but our nativity scene stayed in the big front window.

We talked about the wisemen following the light to find the Messiah, and we went out to the driveway to make our own journey to the manger.

We carried our ceramic wisemen and their camels along the lighted driveway to their proper place next to the stable.

Talked about how Jesus was a surpise –an “epiphany”– in many ways.  He was a tiny baby, not a warrior.  He was in a manger, not a palace.  I loved, loved hearing the boys’ thoughts on these great mysteries.

We closed the evening by putting out straw for the camels in the childrens’ shoes.  (An idea borrowed from Emily.)  Charlotte doesn’t actually have any shoes, so we put out her teddy bear slipper.  The boys thought this fact was hilarious.   We awoke the next morning to a tangerine and a Matchbox car for each boy.  Charlotte received a hair bow.  Lots of fun!

Thinking of Thanksgiving

It felt strange to celebrate our first major holiday without our families.  We received a generous invitation to dine with new friends.  What a sweet offer!  But having just closed on our new house, we wanted to give thanks in our very own diningroom.

(Please pardon Miss Drooly.)

After dinner, we went back to the rental home for apple pie and some Skype time with family.  My sister-in-law took this picture of her younger son “Skyping” with my boys.  Celebrating Thanksgiving in our new town and new house was joyful, but what I would have given to jump through the computer screen into the arms of the people I love!